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How much wrestling actually happened at Survivor Series 2022?

WWE.com

WWE featured five total matches on the main card of Survivor Series 2022, which took place on Nov. 26 in Boston, Massachusetts.

The main card of this pay-per-view (PPV) lasted 3 hours, 13 minutes, and 51 seconds (3h 13m 51s). Here is a sorted list of the bell-to-bell times for the five matches that took place during this event:

  • 39m 36s: Women’s War Games
  • 38m 33s: Men’s War Games
  • 18m 22s: AJ Styles vs. Finn Balor
  • 14m 51s: Rollins vs. Lashley vs. Theory
  • 7m 13s: Ronda Rousey vs. Shotzi

These times add up to 1h 58m 35s, which is roughly 61.2% of the show. For comparison’s sake, the overall match time percentage for all 136 WWE PPVs since the start of 2013 is 53.6%.

The most interesting thing to look at here is the timing of the two War Games matches. Let’s see how closely WWE adhered to their official rules of three minute waiting periods following an initial five minute waiting period.


Here are the approximate times for the waiting periods in the Men’s War Games match, in chronological order:

5m 05s: Butch vs. Jey Uso
3m 08s: Ridge Holland enters, 2 vs. 1
3m 33s: Sami Zayn enters, 2 vs. 2
3m 07s: Drew McIntyre enters, 3 vs. 2
3m 00s: Jimmy Uso enters, 3 vs. 3
3m 06s: Kevin Owens enters, 4 vs. 3
3m 11s: Solo Sikoa enters, 4 vs. 4
3m 16s: Sheamus enters, 5 vs. 4

When the clock hit zero for the final time, about 34 seconds lapsed before Roman Reigns entered the cage and the bell rang again to officially begin the final portion of the match. The match ended about 10m 33s later.

In a perfectly timed match, the eight waiting periods would have combined to last 26m 00s. The actual combined length was 27m 26s.

Only two of the waiting periods fell within five seconds of its expected length.

Overall, the times for the men’s match were much closer to the listed goal than the women’s match, as you’ll soon see. Only one waiting period was more than 20 seconds off the mark here. That was the 2 vs. 2 period with Sami Zayn joining the match to work alongside Jey Uso. It took Sami a little over one full minute of that time just to enter the cage.

WWE showed their running clock during different parts of this period. There was one point where WWE’s clock said 1m 28s remained in the period. Their clock disappeared from the screen at that point. The clock reappeared exactly one minute later in real time, but according to WWE’s clock there were still 0m 55s left in the period. This is where the math largely goes wrong, because only 0m 33s seconds lapsed on WWE’s clock during that 60 seconds of real time. This added 27 seconds to the waiting period right there, and accounts for most of the extra time beyond the listed goal of 3m 00s. Jey and Sami argued with each other during that time where WWE’s math went wrong, while Butch was setting up to hit them both with a moonsault.

It’s also worth noting that the initial waiting period was timed correctly once WWE’s clock actually started to tick down. Their clock didn’t start counting down from 5m 00s until five seconds after the bell rang to start the match with Butch and Jey.


Now here are the approximate times for the waiting periods in the Women’s War Games match, in chronological order:

5m 02s: Bianca Belair vs. Dakota Kai
3m 10s: IYO SKY enters, 2 vs. 1
2m 46s: Asuka enters, 2 vs. 2
2m 39s: Nikki Cross enters, 3 vs. 2
3m 06s: Alexa Bliss enters, 3 vs. 3
3m 33s: Bayley enters, 4 vs. 3
4m 01s: Mia Yim enters, 4 vs. 4
3m 11s: Rhea Ripley enters, 5 vs. 4

When the clock hit zero for the final time, about 12 seconds lapsed before Becky Lynch entered the cage and the bell rang again to officially begin the final portion of the match. The match ended about 11m 56s later.

In a perfectly timed match, the eight waiting periods would have combined to last 26m 00s. The actual combined length was 27m 28s. This is almost an exact match for the men’s combined waiting periods, even though the distribution of individual times greatly varies between the two matches.

Only one waiting period came within five seconds of its expected length.

Three of the waiting periods were more than 20 seconds off the mark. Here’s a breakdown of these three outliers.

During the period that lasted 2m 39s, Nikki Cross spent about one minute of that time making her entrance and loading the ring with plunder. WWE’s clock appeared on screen a few seconds later to indicate there was 1m 58s remaining in the period, so the period was actually going to last 6 seconds longer than it should have according to my clock. Later on, WWE’s clock indicated 1m 44s were left, before disappearing from screen. The clock reappeared 24 seconds later, but said there were only 0m 53s remaining. That means WWE’s clock ticked down by 0m 51s across these 24 seconds of real time. I guess they didn’t want to spend any more time having Nikki Cross batter her foes with weapons. WWE cut out 27 seconds right there, which counteracted the extra six seconds Nikki was given to load the ring up with weapons, resulting in a period that fell under the 3m 00s goal by 21 seconds.

The period where Bayley entered the cage lasted 3m 33s. It took Bayley about 1m 39s to load the ring up with ladders and a table, though WWE’s clock indicated there was 1m 34s left in the period at that point, for a discrepancy of 13 seconds. Later on, WWE’s clock disappeared off the screen when it said there were 42 seconds left in the period. Their clock reappeared 46 seconds later in real time, but it said there were 15 seconds remaining. That means WWE added 19 seconds to the clock right there. During this time, I think WWE was stalling a bit for all of the babyfaces to be laid out ahead of Mia Yim’s entrance.

Mia Yim entered next, and this period lasted a whopping 4m 01s. Shortly after Yim loaded the ring with garbage cans, WWE’s clock indicated there was 2m 24s left in the period, which was four seconds off of my clock. WWE’s clock remained on screen until it showed that 0m 51s remained. Their clock reappeared on screen 94 seconds later in real time, but it said 0m 15s remained in the period, which means their clock only dropped by 36 seconds during that time. This is where WWE added about 58 seconds to the period. WWE was clearly waiting for four consecutive superplexes to be executed, so that all eight women were laid out with Rhea Ripley looming as the next entrant. Once the superplexes were all nailed, that’s when WWE’s clock magically reappeared with 0m 15s remaining.


That’s all I got for the breakdown of the timing of the War Games matches. WWE’s clock discrepancies added less than two full minutes to the length of each match.

Are you surprised by any of the match times at Survivor Series, Cagesiders? Which of these matches received less (or more) time than you hoped for?

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