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The Best WWE Theme Songs of the Last Decade

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From 2011 to today, these are the songs that bang the hardest

Music and pro wrestling go together like writers and cliches. A good theme can make or a break someone even before we see them throw a single punch. But what’s the secret to dope entrance music? Besides the song capturing exactly who that wrestler is, it also has to be something that can be played at an ignorant volume and enjoyed on its own. The NWO theme said exactly who that group was—all 50 versions of the NWO—but it would be a banger with or without the association.

On the other hand, there’s a song like Seth Rollins’ old theme, which comes off like generic create-a-wrestler music from any WWE video game. In fact, nothing about it said “Seth Rollins” until they threw in someone yelling his catchphrase at the top of their lungs. But even then? Still a swing and a miss.

You’re not here for that though. You’re here because you were promised a list of the best WWE themes since 2011, and a list you shall get. We’ve gotten a lot of WWE themes from 2011 to now, but these are my picks for the best of the best.

Without further adieu:

1. ‘Undisputed’

CFO$ isn’t always my brand of water, but this song is a damn home run. Much like the aforementioned NWO theme, it’s heavy on guitar with a pretty simple loop and explains everything about Undisputed Era before they hit the ring.

“Undisputed” is infectious too. You’ll probably be humming it or listening to the song long after you’ve gone to the comments section to tell me how angry you are about my picks.

2. ‘Phenomenal’

I’m a Hip-Hop head so it took everything for me to not instantly throw this at number one. However, it’s an easy choice for number two and is one of the best songs on this list, wrestling aside. Styles’ theme fits everything about who he is in WWE, whether its as the face of Smackdown, the guy determined to knock John Cena off his very high horse, or the man who currently walks around with a very tall “friend.”

The blend of Gospel, Blues, and Hip-Hop creates something that perfectly introduced AJ Styles at the Royal Rumble in 2016 and whether you know all the words or not, we all remember “they don’t want none.”

3. ‘The Rising Sun’

When a theme gets an entire crowd on their feet, has no words, and yet they still find a way to sing it in unison, that’s magic. Shinsuke Nakamura’s theme bangs and has since his days in NXT. It’s mysterious, dangerous, and elegant all at once. In other words, it fits Nakamura like a glove.

I’m a big fan of strings and the string section puts in work on this one. I’ll take this version over the bad guy variant simply because the strings are the star of the show and should never play the background.

4. ‘The Future’

Asuka’s theme is just pure, uncut dope. That’s all that really needs to be said.

But I’ll say more.

In an arena, most of the words are drowned out and it kinda doesn’t even matter. Don’t get me wrong, the lyrics say something about Asuka and yes, she is indeed the future. However, music is still about this intangible thing we feel in our gut. This song connects the character to the audience because like Asuka herself, the song dominates and overpowers and forces you to give in to its power.

5. ‘Cult of Personality’

Admittedly, this is a bit of a cheat. Right? CM Punk used a classic song to herald his entrance into arenas around the country for three years. Living Colour’s 1988 song is not just seen as one of the greatest rock songs of all-time, and not just a Grammy award-winning song, and not just a really big hit. But it signaled the arrival of something different for the genre.

In 2011, Punk was different. He broke a few rules and created a rabid fanbase that looked to him as their leader against what WWE represented. We all know how that fight went, but for a moment in time, it looked like things were going to change, and this was the revolution’s theme music.

6. ‘Glorious Domination’

This song is Bobby Roode. The pianos, the 80’s rock guitar, the pomp and every ounce of circumstance scream just how pompous Roode is. One could easily make the case this theme is the best thing about Roode’s WWE run and one wouldn’t be wrong. But that’s something we should all be thankful for.

7. ‘Sky’s the Limit’

Much like Roode’s song, Sasha’s theme says every thing about her. Every damn thing. There’s an attitude the song projects from the opening bars and every single lyric feels like a piece of a personal statement. Even as a heel, the idea of pushing obstacles out of your way to achieve your dreams makes a whole lot of sense.

I’m not a fan of the rapping in the least. But while it’s meh at best, it doesn’t detract from the song and the rhymes still serve to enforce the song’s message. “Sky’s the Limit” is another ear worm that eventually works its way into the bloodstream. How can you not cheer for this woman?!

8. ‘Dream’

Like Shawn Michaels’ theme, Velveteen Dream’s entrance music communicates how he’s not the average WWE cat. Going with Prince for inspiration is never a bad thing...if done well. Luckily for everyone involved, including those of us with ears, this is a great rift and tribute to possibly the greatest musician of all-time.

A great theme is one where it’s hard imagining anyone else with it. There’s not a soul in WWE, AEW, Impact, NJPW, or backyard wrestling who can rock this song other than Velveteen Dream.

9. ‘Destroyer’

Samoa Joe’s joint comes straight out of a Godzilla movie. Seriously, it’s fuel for kaiju to obliterate any and everything in their path just for fun. The title makes a lot of sense.

Joe’s theme just works. The crowd loves it, it bangs with the volume turned way up, and it wraps around Joe like a warm blanket. Of course, that blanket is probably made of barbed wire and the stuff they use for Brillo pads, but Joe wouldn’t have it any other way.

Also? Joe’s gonna kill you, so there’s that.

10. ‘Live in Fear’

I was torn between this version and the latest incarnation for The Fiend. I’m happy with my choice.

This song evokes a time, place, and immediate idea of the type of person who would ride around listening to it. Bray Wyatt—the non-Fiend version—is the embodiment of this music. Maybe it’s the floral shirts. Or perhaps it’s the drawl. Then again, it’s probably that damn hat he used to wear. But it just feels right like he listens to this while riding around in a Buick or Cadillac figuring out who he wants to kill or worse, who he wants to torture and then eventually kill.


That’s my top ten. Now give us yours.