clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Control Your Narrative officially bans superkicks, embraces “quotation marks”

EC3’s Instagram

EC3’s posted the official rules & regulations for his Control Your Narrative promotion ahead of their second show in Texas on Mar. 31. Like most things CYN, they’re... something.

Number five is the one getting most of the attention. And that’s the main thing this, and almost all of what EC3 and Adam Scherr have done with CYN, is designed to do: get people talking. Most of that talking takes the form of dunking on them, but it’s kept them in trending topics for weeks. Having some corners of the internet mocking them also fires up the base who’s bought into the promotion’s anti-WWE, Fight Club for Dummies vibe.

It’s the excessive use of written air quotes that gets me, though. In addition to just being annoying, they’re used for nearly every term associated with pro wrestling/sports entertainment. So — like banning superkicks, suicide dives, and Canadian Destroyers — differentiating “matches” from fights is saying all that other stuff is fake, but we’re REAL.

As with every other time somebody involved in worked combat sports exhibitions starts throwing around the f-word, that seems like a bad idea. The reason we know the people on CYN cards is because of their participation in “matches”, and they’ll be continuing to try to get us to pay to seem them on other “professional wrestling” cards. Should we dismiss those because they’re not in the PROJECT PIT and won’t end with an announcer the winner has controlled their narrative*?

That’s what has me rolling my eyes at these rules. But what do I know? I’m sure Scherr would call me a mark.

Let us know what you think. The first two rules of CYN are that you’re in control, after all.

* Yes, at the first CYN show in Florida earlier this month victors were reportedly announced as having controlled their narrative.