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WWE doesn’t need pyro, but losing it is still a shame

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Friday’s Rude Awakening looks at WWE’s decision to cut out pyro, the Mae Young Classic, and Impact focusing on the suspended Alberto El Patron.

WWE.com

We publish a whole lot of content here at Cageside Seats. We’re also [looks around and whispers so the bosses can’t hear] not the only place producing wrestling content on the internet. So, as a service to you on the weekdays, we’ll be producing a wrestling newsletter, "Rude Awakening." Well, it will be a newsletter eventually: for now, it’ll just be part of your experience here at Cageside, collecting the news, recaps, and social moments from the greater wrestling universe daily so you won’t fall behind, with a newsletter format to come.

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WWE has cut pyro out of their shows as a cost-cutting measure. Dave Meltzer talked about it on Wrestling Observer Radio over the weekend, and then Road Dogg confirmed it was the case while tweeting with a fan on Thursday:

Road Dogg went on to tweet that, “In 3 months it'll be the norm and no one will care, that's our current society. Pyro in a Wrestling show isn't a priority in life.” He’s not wrong, and WWE doesn’t need pyro for their shows to be entertaining. It’s still a bit of a shame to have that taken away, however, as it’s just one more way that WWE is a bit more like everyone else instead of using their resources to stand out and improve the product.

If there were competitors with flashy entrances and pyro that were drawing viewers away from WWE, that would be one thing, but there aren’t. There’s no WCW out there putting out custom sets for every pay-per-view, forcing WWE to up their presentation game. So, in the interest of saving money, not setting off a ton of fireworks before every television show, and not shooting off pyro during a number of wrestlers’ entrances, is a move that makes sense, and likely makes stockholders happy. It does damage the art of it all, though, as fireworks and pyro have a way of making everything seem just a little bit bigger.