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On this date in WWF history: The Brawl To End It All sees Wendi Richter dethrone The Fabulous Moolah

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The Brawl To End It All went down on this date in WWF history, as Wendi Richter dethroned The Fabulous Moolah after a near 30 year reign as champion.

Hulk Hogan is widely credited with building the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) into the juggernaut it was in the 1980s with his lengthy title reign that started in 1984 and didn't end until 1988. And it's undeniable that he was the most popular guy on the roster who sold tickets all across the United States and helped make the company a ton of money.

But let's not forget about the Rock-N-Wrestling Connection that helped him get there. And it was on this date in history (July 23, 1984) that it all started with The Brawl To End It All.

The event had an entire card of 10 matches that weren't broadcast with only the main event shown on MTV, which was just a few years into its existence. The show was centered around a women's championship match with The Fabulous Moolah defending her title, of which she had held for nearly 30 years, against Wendi Richter.

What made it so important and popular, however, is the fact that Cyndi Lauper was involved. This was fresh on the heels of her Girls Just Want To Have Fun music video that also featured Captain Lou Albano. They turned it into an angle with Albano taking credit for Lauper's success and Lauper refuting those claims during a segment of Piper's Pit with Roddy Piper.

It all led to a match with Albano in Moolah's corner and Lauper in Richters. There isn't much to be said about the match itself, which was low on workrate but high on intrigue, other than the fact that it did a 9.0 Nielsen rating. That blew away expectations and set the stage for the big wrestling boom. Remember, this was almost a full year before the first WrestleMania.

Lauper and Richter may not have gone over big when they returned to WWE on an episode of Monday Night Raw last year but that's likely because many fans today don't truly understand the impact they had on the business during a time when the WWF wasn't nearly as steady as it is today.

Watch the Moolah vs. Richter match: